Best use of “an oppressed bootjack” in a sentence?

Check out this nineteenth-century version of Cards Against Humanity, “A Trip to Paris, A Laughable Game,” courtesy of our friends at the American Antiquarian Society.  You, too, will thrill to the answer of the question, “a tender-hearted doughnut, or an intoxicated clam?”

My question remains, however:  what’s the nineteenth-century version of “naked and face-down in a Denny’s parking lot?”

 

 

6 thoughts on “Best use of “an oppressed bootjack” in a sentence?

  1. My question remains, however: what’s the nineteenth-century version of “naked and face-down in a Denny’s parking lot?”

    I am a nice guy so I would not know, but if I were to speculate it involved Rimbaud, absinthe, and the Bois de Bologne

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  2. “An oppressed bootjack” reminds me that I’d like to steal one of those Greek columns underlying the busts behind the gamebrarians, to place it under a miniature 1745 cheap reproduction French globe that I have. Anyone out there know where you can actually get those things, without having to resort to the “smash-and-grab” methodology that I can’t bring myself to try on the street? Every time I see one in a flower shop, a coffee shop, or some other retail venue, doing its decorative duty, and ask the proprietors, it almost seems as though it’s some kind of a cult thing, where you have to know somebody. Hopefully this bootjack didn’t lead me into a threadjack, which is one level beneath smash-and-grab.
    Face down in parking lot puts me in mind, for now, of that awful biker thing in Waco.

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