The net effect of the "high cost of higher ed" argument

This is the first of the 2010-2011 academic year’s series, Excellence Without Money(a term coined by the b!tchez at Roxie’s World in their series on the high cost of not funding higher education.)  For the full archives at both blogs, click away on those links, darlings. I’ve been doing a little thinking about the effects of … Continue reading The net effect of the "high cost of higher ed" argument

I didn't wake up angry about my six-hour per week job.

Over Ten Million Served:  Gendered Service in Lanugage and Literature Workplaces is a new book edited by Michelle A. Massé and Katie J. Hogan that raises two old questions:  1) Why don’t academic workplaces value service and honor it in career advancement to the degree it should be, and 2) How is this undervaluing of … Continue reading I didn't wake up angry about my six-hour per week job.

Excellence without Money!, part III: Knowledge without Books!

Another in our occasional series on the Great Recession and the crisis in funding public institutions of higher education, with thanks to Moose at Roxie’s World for coining the phrase “Excellence without Money!” Johann Neem, an Associate Professor of History at Western Washington University, has an article over at Inside Higher Ed called “Reviving the Academic … Continue reading Excellence without Money!, part III: Knowledge without Books!

Women's bodies in the crosshairs of "health care reform"

It’s interesting (and sadly unsurprising) to me that two of the most powerful and emotional arguments the right-wing is mounting against health care reform have women’s bodies–or, more specifically, their uteri–at the center of them.  First of all, of course, the faithful are being scared to death that increasing government involvement in and funding for health care will … Continue reading Women's bodies in the crosshairs of "health care reform"