“Scent of a Woman’s Ink” updated for a new generation with no good news

The title of this post refers to a 1998 essay by Francine Prose, “Scent of a Woman’s Ink:  Are Women Writers Really Inferior?”  Nearly twenty years later, the results aren’t encouraging for women.  Over at Jezebel, Catherine Nichols writes about sending out queries to agents for the same novel, with the same cover letter and … Continue reading “Scent of a Woman’s Ink” updated for a new generation with no good news

Crossing over, part III: The uses and limits of literary models

Today’s post is an unanticipated part III in my series Crossing Over, on writing and publishing an academic book that aims to be a “crossover” title with a popular audience.  Part I can be found here, “What is my book about?”, and Part II here, “Will I ever publish this book?”  Many thanks to those of you … Continue reading Crossing over, part III: The uses and limits of literary models

Crossing over, part I: What is my book about?

In a post last weekend, I revealed that my forthcoming book, The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright (Yale University Press, forthcoming 2016) would be published as a crossover academic-trade title.  Some of you expressed interest in how I got a contract like this, as many of the scholar-readers here are interested in writing beyond a traditional academic … Continue reading Crossing over, part I: What is my book about?

Blooming where you’re planted, flourishing in stony soil, plus Robert Frost

Tom Bredehoft has another post up at Chancery Hill Books about the ways in which not teaching at an R-1 fundamentally shaped his career as a scholar in fruitful ways.  In brief, he writes that building his career at a regional comprehensive university and then adjuncting for a few years at another university made him a more … Continue reading Blooming where you’re planted, flourishing in stony soil, plus Robert Frost