Amherst faculty tells edX: drop dead.

I love the Amherst faculty’s commitment to educational rather than “edupreneurial” (or edupredatory) values.  To be sure, there was the huge issue of institutional mission versus the mission–so far as anyone can figure it out–of these unproven for-profit ventures we call MOOCs: Some Amherst faculty concerns about edX were specific to Amherst. For instance, faculty … Continue reading Amherst faculty tells edX: drop dead.

Is it really “higher education” without tenured faculty?

How many of you college or university faculty members would have gone into your line of work without the hope of tenure? I was thinking about this with respect to a survey of provosts published by Inside Higher Ed today.  Among other interesting findings, the provosts surveyed said this about tenure: The survey found that … Continue reading Is it really “higher education” without tenured faculty?

La Loca contemplates bespoke suits and online education. Historiann contemplates the profit motive at her allegedly non-profit employer.

I know many of my readers also follow Dr. Crazy, but just in case you missed her post from earlier this week, I’ll show you a preview and encourage you to go read the whole post over at her place.  First of all, she writes: You might think that I am a person who would … Continue reading La Loca contemplates bespoke suits and online education. Historiann contemplates the profit motive at her allegedly non-profit employer.

The beatings will indeed continue until morale improves

First, go read Tenured Radical’s post from yesterday.  I’ll wait. Doesn’t President Barack Obama’s speech at the University of Michigan remind you of the time that George W. Bush went to Notre Dame and Bob Jones and told them to stop being such one-issue whiners about abortion?  Or like that time he went to Haliburton and … Continue reading The beatings will indeed continue until morale improves

The “crisis” in higher ed? truffula sniffs out “administrative bloat.”

Of all of the contributions I’ve had to the “crisis” of higher education meme inspired by Tony Grafton’s recent review in the New York Review of Books, no one has yet called out administrators and/or administrative bloat.  Most of us humanist faculty types appear to see the liberal arts college administrators as tapdancing as fast as they … Continue reading The “crisis” in higher ed? truffula sniffs out “administrative bloat.”

What’s the matter with higher ed? Too much talk about degrees, not enough talk about achievement.

I’ll have a comprehensive post up tomorrow with all of your wonderful links and contributions to this conversation, but I thought I’d lay out briefly something that I’ve been thinking about this week with respect to the ongoing “crisis of higher education” conversations we’ve been having.  In particular, I’d like once again to address the … Continue reading What’s the matter with higher ed? Too much talk about degrees, not enough talk about achievement.

Tony Grafton on the higher education crisis, and your turn to talk back!

Via my colleague Nathan Citino who reads the New York Review of Books, we learn that Tony Grafton has written a thoughtful review of the raft of books on the “crisis” of higher education in the United States published recently.  He dislikes the polemics that pick one enemy–the lazy-a$$ed faculty who allegedly never teach, or the … Continue reading Tony Grafton on the higher education crisis, and your turn to talk back!

Physicians "opting out:" gender and medical education as a privilege, not an entitlement

Karen S. Sibert, MD, a Los Angeles anesthesiologist, raises the alarm about the looming shortage of doctors in the U.S., and notes that this is especially alarming given the trend among younger women doctors to work part-time at a moment when they’ve become more than half of all primary care physicians in the U.S.  (H/t to commenter … Continue reading Physicians "opting out:" gender and medical education as a privilege, not an entitlement

Newsflash: Excellence Costs Money!

So says Sarah Lawrence College President Karen Lawrence about her college’s rating as the most expensive in the U.S.: That’s partly because over 90 percent of all Sarah Lawrence classes are small seminars (with an average of 11 students) and every seminar includes a “conference” component in which each student designs an independent project and meets … Continue reading Newsflash: Excellence Costs Money!

The Three Rhing Circus of "Education Reform"

Guess what?  When you make people’s jobs and bonuses contingent on the performance of their students on high-stakes standardized tests, they have a really strong incentive to cheat!  Check out the details of Michelle Rhee’s tenure as Chancellor of the Washington, D.C. schools as reported by USA Today this week: Michelle Rhee, then chancellor of … Continue reading The Three Rhing Circus of "Education Reform"