That time of the year: empty brains, embodiment, Bartleby, and the mooks pushing MOOCs

This is a cross-section of my skull right now.  Last classes are tomorrow. I am grateful to MOOCs and to the specter of online courses for something:  they have made me grateful for the “residential instruction” classes I teach and the embodied human students who enroll in them.  I’ve had a particularly great group of … Continue reading That time of the year: empty brains, embodiment, Bartleby, and the mooks pushing MOOCs

Great prediction, Carnac: a brief history of the future of online education

One of the great things about blogging for the better part of a decade is that you can hold people accountable for the silly things they once said, or wrote, and presumably believed. Do you remember 2010?  Like yesterday?  Here’s columnist Froma Harrop on September 21, 2010: Bill Gates recently predicted: “Five years from now … Continue reading Great prediction, Carnac: a brief history of the future of online education

Thursday round-up: the hang together or hang separately edition

Friends!  Angelenos!  Countrywomen!  I’ve been in SoCA so long you probably thought I had traded in my cowgirl boots for flip-flops permanently.  No way!  Never fear.  You can take the cowgirl out of Colorado, but you can’t take Colorado out of the cowgirl. Anyhoo:  I’m too busy to write a real blog post this morning, … Continue reading Thursday round-up: the hang together or hang separately edition

An elementary explanation for how ed tech widens, rather than narrows, the achievement gap

Are the Lords of MOOC Creation listening?  I doubt it, but let’s review this article at Slate by Annie Murphy Paul anyway: Why would improved access to the Internet harm the academic performance of poor students in particular? Vigdor and his colleagues speculate that “this may occur because student computer use is more effectively monitored … Continue reading An elementary explanation for how ed tech widens, rather than narrows, the achievement gap