The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright gets a rave review in the Maine Sunday Telegram

The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright gets a rave review in this morning’s Maine Sunday Telegram (the Sunday edition of the Portland Press Herald, FYI): Ann M. Little’s telling of Esther Wheelwright’s story illuminates issues of class, status and gender through the 18th century and across continents. In her intriguing new biography, “The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright,” Ann M. … Continue reading The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright gets a rave review in the Maine Sunday Telegram

From the mailbag: it’s an old-fashioned, Historiann round-up!

Oh, my friends:  so much is happening globally, nationally, regionally, locally, and even here at the Black Cat Ranch that it’s hard to find time to blog even just one little bit these days.  My apologies!  Over the weekend I saved up some bits and bobs of oakum, old yarn, and loose string that might … Continue reading From the mailbag: it’s an old-fashioned, Historiann round-up!

Teaser Tuesday: Puritan, Captive, Catholic, Spy?

Teaser Tuesday is back after a three-week holiday hiatus with a penultimate post, this one from the penultimate chapter of my book, The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright.  Today I offer you a little eighteenth-century intrigue surrounding Mother Esther near the time of her first election as mother superior in late 1760, after the British conquest … Continue reading Teaser Tuesday: Puritan, Captive, Catholic, Spy?

Teaser Tuesday: missing men & missing trousers! Whaaaaat?

Yo yo—What time is it?  Showtime!  OK, I’ll stop setting everything that goes through my head to the tune of various Hamilton:  An American Musical songs.  Sometimes it makes me wonder why I even bring the thunder (why she even brings the thunder!)  Sorry–that was the last one, but as it happens, our subject is … Continue reading Teaser Tuesday: missing men & missing trousers! Whaaaaat?

“I cannot imagine the sheer will it took to endure:” Part II of my interview with Angels of the Underground author Theresa Kaminski

Today we bring you Part II of my interview with Theresa Kaminski, the author of Angels of the Underground:  the American Women who Resisted the Japanese in the Philippines in World War II.  (You can find part I of the interview here.)  Yesterday when we left off, we were discussing the gender and sexual politics of … Continue reading “I cannot imagine the sheer will it took to endure:” Part II of my interview with Angels of the Underground author Theresa Kaminski

Who’s doing all that domestic work inside the convent? Teaser Tuesday returns with some hidden labor history

Teaser Tuesday is back with more secrets of the convent from chapter four of my new book, The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright, namely:  who’s doing all of the laundry, cleaning, and cooking inside the Ursuline convent in Québec?  The aristocratic daughters of (often literally) entitled colonial officials, military officers, and fur trade merchants performed only … Continue reading Who’s doing all that domestic work inside the convent? Teaser Tuesday returns with some hidden labor history

Teaser Tuesday: the return of Nabby Adams, nuns’ clothing ceremonies, and a new doll!

Today’s Teaser Tuesday excerpt from The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright features one of the more dramatic passages in the book–Esther’s clothing ceremony (or Vêture) in January 1713 at age of 16 that represented her formal admission as an Ursuline novice.  The novitiate, characterized by the great scholar of French religious women in the early modern period, Diane Rapley, … Continue reading Teaser Tuesday: the return of Nabby Adams, nuns’ clothing ceremonies, and a new doll!

Teaser Tuesday: Gender, race, and intellectual authority in the Ursuline Convent

Teaser Tuesday is back, my friends.  Today’s excerpt from my new book, The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright, focuses on the education of girls and the racial and cultural politics in the Ursuline convent and school.  When she’s enrolled in the school, her name is first written into the boarding school records as “a little English girl … Continue reading Teaser Tuesday: Gender, race, and intellectual authority in the Ursuline Convent