The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright gets a rave review in the Maine Sunday Telegram

The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright gets a rave review in this morning’s Maine Sunday Telegram (the Sunday edition of the Portland Press Herald, FYI): Ann M. Little’s telling of Esther Wheelwright’s story illuminates issues of class, status and gender through the 18th century and across continents. In her intriguing new biography, “The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright,” Ann M. … Continue reading The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright gets a rave review in the Maine Sunday Telegram

Teaser Tuesday: Why do readers clamor for books about people they’ve already heard of?

Hey, kids:  It’s publication day.  Huzzah!  The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright (Yale University Press, 2016) has officially dropped!  Now you can read all about the 7-year old Anglo-American girl from New England, taken in wartime by the Wabanaki, who became a student and then choir nun at the Ursuline convent in Québec.  She then became the … Continue reading Teaser Tuesday: Why do readers clamor for books about people they’ve already heard of?

Georgetown University and the legacy of slavery

I’m pretty underwhelmed by Georgetown University’s offer to give “preference in admissions” to the descendants of the enslaved people whose sale (and breakup of their families) financed the university in its earliest days.  For those of you who missed the story this week: In 1838, two priests who served as president of the university orchestrated the … Continue reading Georgetown University and the legacy of slavery

We’re number one!

Click here now–it might not last, but the Amazon.com page for The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright is the NUMBER ONE new release today for Canadian historical biographies!  W00T!!! Only 43 days to go until the book itself is finally released from captivity. . .

Three lessons on women’s leadership from inside an Ursuline convent

Modern and mostly secular folks probably wouldn’t think that religious people might teach us something about politics and leadership.  But there are important lessons about leadership found in my study of a seventeenth- and eighteenth-century religious order over the course of 150 years or so.  After all, Catholic women religious have been electing their leadership … Continue reading Three lessons on women’s leadership from inside an Ursuline convent

Women and leadership: more fresh entries in “Run Like a Girl” series at Nursing Clio

I’ve fallen behind! Remember a few weeks back when I directed your attention to Nursing Clio’s important new series on women who have run for president of the United States, Run Like a Girl? There are two more entries I haven’t posted about! If you recall, the first in the series featured (naturally!) the first … Continue reading Women and leadership: more fresh entries in “Run Like a Girl” series at Nursing Clio

“Pocahontas”: an insult, or an inspiring diplomat and politician?

I’ve been meaning to write for weeks about Donald Trump’s nickname for Elizabeth Warren.  As a historian who has written a few books that include some Algonquian (Eastern woodlands Indian) history, and a lot of women’s history, it’s been on my mind. But first, a little background:  last month, Trump started calling her Pocahontas, intending … Continue reading “Pocahontas”: an insult, or an inspiring diplomat and politician?