Today’s example of brainless, fact-free so-called “Founding Fathers” worship

Today’s example comes from Katherine Kersten, a fellow at something called the Center for the American Experiment in Crappy History.  It’s a twist on the “Obama is not an American” theme so popular with anti-Obamaniacs these days.  Big news, kids:  President Barack Obama’s agenda is not rooted in Kenyan anti-colonialism.  Instead, it’s rooted in Kaiserreich … Continue reading Today’s example of brainless, fact-free so-called “Founding Fathers” worship

Public intellectual William Lloyd Garrison on the so-called “Founding Fathers” and historic preservation

On Wednesday, La Famille Historiann availed themselves of the Downeaster train service from Maine for a whirlwind day trip to Boston.  Because the train took us to North Station, we thought it made perfect sense to pick up the Freedom Trail in the North End and see where it might take us.  Well, friends, we … Continue reading Public intellectual William Lloyd Garrison on the so-called “Founding Fathers” and historic preservation

Sausage party for the so-called "Founding Fathers"

And why in the h-e-double-hockey sticks are we talking about George Washington?  Again!  (Like we haven’t done that enough for the past 250 years?) I subscribe to an ancient technology called a “listserv” on early American history.  (You can read it in HTML digest form here.)  It’s mostly totes boring, and only rarely does it … Continue reading Sausage party for the so-called "Founding Fathers"

Sausage party, or wiener roast? Founding Fathers/Presidential Chic, again!

David Eisenbach, co-author of One Nation Under Sex: How the Private Lives of Presidents, First Ladies and Their Lovers Changed the Course of American History along with pR0n king Larry Flynt, has responded to my critique of his book, which was more a critique of the genre than of his book in particular.  As some readers … Continue reading Sausage party, or wiener roast? Founding Fathers/Presidential Chic, again!

Sexual humiliation in American women’s political history: the longue durée

On my way to and from work lately, I’ve been listening to the original cast album of Hamilton, which is of course as catchy and terrific as everyone says it is.  (Trust me:  it’s worth even more than the hype, and I bow to no one in trashing the so-called Founding Fathers, although I do … Continue reading Sexual humiliation in American women’s political history: the longue durée

Teaser Tuesday: Why do readers clamor for books about people they’ve already heard of?

Hey, kids:  It’s publication day.  Huzzah!  The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright (Yale University Press, 2016) has officially dropped!  Now you can read all about the 7-year old Anglo-American girl from New England, taken in wartime by the Wabanaki, who became a student and then choir nun at the Ursuline convent in Québec.  She then became the … Continue reading Teaser Tuesday: Why do readers clamor for books about people they’ve already heard of?

Phantom plagiarists, academic boogeymen, and open access fears that go bump in the night

Some of you may have read about the recent call from the American Historical Association to Ph.D.-granting universities to permit their recently credentialed historians to leave their dissertations off-line for six years in order to give the junior scholar time to revise the dissertation for publication.  The AHA’s reasoning? History has been and remains a … Continue reading Phantom plagiarists, academic boogeymen, and open access fears that go bump in the night

Teaser Tuesday: Gender, race, and intellectual authority in the Ursuline Convent

Teaser Tuesday is back, my friends.  Today’s excerpt from my new book, The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright, focuses on the education of girls and the racial and cultural politics in the Ursuline convent and school.  When she’s enrolled in the school, her name is first written into the boarding school records as “a little English girl … Continue reading Teaser Tuesday: Gender, race, and intellectual authority in the Ursuline Convent

The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright gets a rave review in the Maine Sunday Telegram

The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright gets a rave review in this morning’s Maine Sunday Telegram (the Sunday edition of the Portland Press Herald, FYI): Ann M. Little’s telling of Esther Wheelwright’s story illuminates issues of class, status and gender through the 18th century and across continents. In her intriguing new biography, “The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright,” Ann M. … Continue reading The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright gets a rave review in the Maine Sunday Telegram

Students protest Jefferson statues on campuses with sticky notes

This is so 2015:  According to Inside Higher Ed, “At both the University of Missouri at Columbia and the College of William & Mary, critics have been placing yellow sticky notes on [Thomas] Jefferson statues, labeling him — among other things — ‘rapist’ and ‘racist.’”   Polite, inoffensive, non-vandalizing sticky notes with words on them, and … Continue reading Students protest Jefferson statues on campuses with sticky notes