Pushbutton teacher, now on public access television!

Jonathan Rees hits another one out of the park today with “When Professors Disappear,” his demolition of the magical thinking about online courses, for-profit colleges, and the labor history that reveals the insidiousness of these phenomena.  (And, something silly someone said in the New York Times about disappearing professors because the internets will replace us, or something.)  I’d like to … Continue reading Pushbutton teacher, now on public access television!

Great prediction, Carnac: a brief history of the future of online education

One of the great things about blogging for the better part of a decade is that you can hold people accountable for the silly things they once said, or wrote, and presumably believed. Do you remember 2010?  Like yesterday?  Here’s columnist Froma Harrop on September 21, 2010: Bill Gates recently predicted: “Five years from now … Continue reading Great prediction, Carnac: a brief history of the future of online education

That time of the year: empty brains, embodiment, Bartleby, and the mooks pushing MOOCs

This is a cross-section of my skull right now.  Last classes are tomorrow. I am grateful to MOOCs and to the specter of online courses for something:  they have made me grateful for the “residential instruction” classes I teach and the embodied human students who enroll in them.  I’ve had a particularly great group of … Continue reading That time of the year: empty brains, embodiment, Bartleby, and the mooks pushing MOOCs

Historiann retains birthright; tells Pearson to shove mess o’pottage where the sun don’t shine.

Check out an e-mail I just received today from a Pearson representative.  I can get paid $250.00 and have two essay assignments graded for me, if I turn over my students’ papers for the benefit of Pearson’s computer grading scheme!  I just learned about these scamtastic software packages last night via a comment that Indyanna … Continue reading Historiann retains birthright; tells Pearson to shove mess o’pottage where the sun don’t shine.