Family responsibility, fantasy life, and American gun culture

I don’t want to spend the day crying, but here are two interesting articles on gun culture and family responsibility that you might find interesting.  First, sociologist Randall Collins says in Lessons from Newtown for Gun-Owning Parents what I was trying to say in this post, only with actual knowledge and a sociological perspective.  He … Continue reading Family responsibility, fantasy life, and American gun culture

Boston 4/15 and the selective American notion of who is a “terrorist”

Joan Walsh argues that the perps of last week’s attack at the Boston Marathon must be thought of more like domestic mass-murders than “terrorists” with foreign ties: We still know comparatively little about the Tsarnaev brothers, but they seem to have more in common with other American mass murderers than with al-Qaida terrorists of any … Continue reading Boston 4/15 and the selective American notion of who is a “terrorist”

Multi-media Weekend Round-up: The Holly and the Ivy and the Gunsmoke edition

Well, friends, la famille Historiann has had a very good year and we have a lot to be grateful for, the first thing being that none of us was injured or killed by firearms.  I hope that all of you are happy and safe too, and that if you’re traveling, the winter snows blanketing the … Continue reading Multi-media Weekend Round-up: The Holly and the Ivy and the Gunsmoke edition

The gendered expressions of mental illness and violence

I’m sure you all heard yesterday or this morning that the Tucson gunman who intended to assassinate U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-AZ) and who murdered 6 of her constituents and injured 13 others in January was found incompetent to stand trial for his crimes.  Instead, Jared Loughner “will receive treatment in a secure federal mental health facility for … Continue reading The gendered expressions of mental illness and violence

"What about Women in Early American History?" In which Historiann and friends get up on their high horses and rope 'em up good

Howdy, cowgirls and dudes–here’s my long-overdue report on a conversation we had Friday afternoon, June 12 at the Omohundro Institute’s Fifteenth Annual Conference in Salt Lake City.  Called “What about Women in Early America?”it featured Karin Wulf of the College of William and Mary (and the book review editor for the William and Mary Quarterly); Sowande’ Mustakeem of … Continue reading "What about Women in Early American History?" In which Historiann and friends get up on their high horses and rope 'em up good

Let's play "What's Wrong with This Headline?"

OK, kids–here’s today’s challenge:  “Couple, their 3 kids found dead in Maryland home.” Who or what might have killed an entire family?  Was it carbon monoxide?  Botulism?  World War II ordinance discovered in the sandbox too late?  (I’m humming the Jeopardy theme while you click and read.) Time’s up!

Chauncey DeVega’s interview with Richard Slotkin at We Are Respectable Negroes

Check out part two of Chauncey’s podcast series on the relationship between America’s gun culture, citizenship, race, and masculinity, which features Richard Slotkin, the Olin Professor of English at Wesleyan University, and the man whom I would like to nominate as the Dean of American Violence Studies.  Some of you may know Slotkin through his … Continue reading Chauncey DeVega’s interview with Richard Slotkin at We Are Respectable Negroes

Heartbreaking. Now where is our outrage?

Well, another campus has been visited with death and destruction.  Six Five innocent students dead (so far) and fifteen sixteen wounded, including the graduate student instructor.  When I wrote the post Where can I get a high-fashion kevlar vest? last Friday morning, I was a bit prankish in tone at the end.  I should probably clarify my position:  I … Continue reading Heartbreaking. Now where is our outrage?