More on “the bloody, rich mulch of life:” Part II of my interview with The Republic of Nature author Mark Fiege

Today’s post is the second of a two-part interview with Mark Fiege (pronounced FEE-gee, rhymes with BeeGee), who has just published The Republic of Nature:  An Environmental History of the United States (Seattle:  University of Washington Press, 2012).  Mark is a colleague of mine at Baa Ram U., and his book delivers what its sweeping subtitle … Continue reading More on “the bloody, rich mulch of life:” Part II of my interview with The Republic of Nature author Mark Fiege

“Race and nature are at the heart of the story:” Part I of my interview with The Republic of Nature author Mark Fiege

Today’s post is the first of a two-part interview with Mark Fiege (pronounced FEE-gee, rhymes with BeeGee), who has just published The Republic of Nature:  An Environmental History of the United States (Seattle:  University of Washington Press, 2012).  Mark is a colleague of mine at Baa Ram U., and his book delivers what its sweeping … Continue reading “Race and nature are at the heart of the story:” Part I of my interview with The Republic of Nature author Mark Fiege

Make America Great Again? A smackdown on #VastEarlyAmerica

It’s an old-fashioned early American smackdown over at the Omohundro Institute blog:  William and Mary Quarterly editor Joshua Piker engages Gordon Wood’s critique of the journal–and the wider field of early American history and culture.  While waiting 11 months to respond to Wood’s comments is a rather leisurely pace for an online publication, Piker’s blog post suggests … Continue reading Make America Great Again? A smackdown on #VastEarlyAmerica