Nancy Hewitt dishes on "The Leaky Pipeline"

You’re probably like Historiann, in that you didn’t get to see the recent AHA panel called “The Leaky Pipeline:  Issues of Promotion, Retention, and Quality of Life Issues for Women in the Historical Profession,” chaired by Leo Spitzer, and starring Tiya Miles, Claire Potter, and Nancy Hewitt.  (Potter has posted a brief description at Tenured Radical, … Continue reading Nancy Hewitt dishes on "The Leaky Pipeline"

We need a new metaphor: fixing "leaky pipes" won't cut it

Historiann rolled out of bed on the wrong side, late, and with bad hair this morning, so here’s a suitably cranky Monday post to get the rest of you amped up as you trudge off to do the dumb things you gotta do today.  Leslie Madsen-Brooks over at BlogHer picks up on the “leaky pipline” experience of … Continue reading We need a new metaphor: fixing "leaky pipes" won't cut it

Patriarchal equilibrium: we're doin' it rite!

Check out this story from Inside Higher Ed about the effects of gendered language in letters of recommendation submitted for applicants to faculty positions: You are reading a letter of recommendation that praises a candidate for a faculty job as being “caring,” “sensitive,” “compassionate,” or a “supportive colleague.” Whom do you picture? New research suggests … Continue reading Patriarchal equilibrium: we're doin' it rite!

Why we call it patriarchal equilibrium, Part I: Buffalo shuffling off women faculty

You be the judge, and be sure to read the comments–the first one is from a SUNY Buffalo faculty member.  Here are the numbers for tenure and promotion at SUNY Buffalo, where according to Inside Higher Ed, Provost Satish Tripathi has tenured 90% of male candidates, but only 75% of female candidates from 2003-08: [Sex … Continue reading Why we call it patriarchal equilibrium, Part I: Buffalo shuffling off women faculty

Tenure: what is it good for? (Absolutely nothing?)

Well, it’s Spring Break, and the letters will soon rain down from Provost Offices everywhere on assistant professors in their sixth year of employment.  The lucky duckies who get the news that they’re tenured and promoted. . . are permitted to do the same job next year, in perpetuity, and to change their rank to “Associate Professor” on … Continue reading Tenure: what is it good for? (Absolutely nothing?)