Women in Early America: the 2011 WMQ-EMSI workshop at the Huntington Library

Big, big news:  my pal Terri Snyder at Cal State Fullerton is convening a workshop on “Women in Early America” next spring.  This is the sixth annual workshop at the Huntington Library jointly sponsored by the William and Mary Quarterly and the University of Southern California-Huntington Library Early Modern Studies Institute.  I can say from my experience … Continue reading Women in Early America: the 2011 WMQ-EMSI workshop at the Huntington Library

Teaser Tuesday: missing men & missing trousers! Whaaaaat?

Yo yo—What time is it?  Showtime!  OK, I’ll stop setting everything that goes through my head to the tune of various Hamilton:  An American Musical songs.  Sometimes it makes me wonder why I even bring the thunder (why she even brings the thunder!)  Sorry–that was the last one, but as it happens, our subject is … Continue reading Teaser Tuesday: missing men & missing trousers! Whaaaaat?

Who’s doing all that domestic work inside the convent? Teaser Tuesday returns with some hidden labor history

Teaser Tuesday is back with more secrets of the convent from chapter four of my new book, The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright, namely:  who’s doing all of the laundry, cleaning, and cooking inside the Ursuline convent in Québec?  The aristocratic daughters of (often literally) entitled colonial officials, military officers, and fur trade merchants performed only … Continue reading Who’s doing all that domestic work inside the convent? Teaser Tuesday returns with some hidden labor history

Social media for dummies, in which I remind myself not to be a jerk.

Joseph Adelman and Liz Covart were at the Huntington last weekend talking about the digital humanities and early American history.  (Wish I were there!  My ears were burning, though–I hear that this blog came up a lot.)  Joe got a lot of questions about use of Twitter for academics, and published a post explaining his … Continue reading Social media for dummies, in which I remind myself not to be a jerk.

Teaser Tuesday: Why do readers clamor for books about people they’ve already heard of?

Hey, kids:  It’s publication day.  Huzzah!  The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright (Yale University Press, 2016) has officially dropped!  Now you can read all about the 7-year old Anglo-American girl from New England, taken in wartime by the Wabanaki, who became a student and then choir nun at the Ursuline convent in Québec.  She then became the … Continue reading Teaser Tuesday: Why do readers clamor for books about people they’ve already heard of?

Crossing over, part I: What is my book about?

In a post last weekend, I revealed that my forthcoming book, The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright (Yale University Press, forthcoming 2016) would be published as a crossover academic-trade title.  Some of you expressed interest in how I got a contract like this, as many of the scholar-readers here are interested in writing beyond a traditional academic … Continue reading Crossing over, part I: What is my book about?

The climate change debate, nineteenth-century style

From “An Account of Quebec,” The Repository of Arts, Literature, Commerce, Manufactures, Fashions, and Politics, (London: Rudolph Ackermann, September 1809), 149-150. Although Quebec is situated so far south as 46º 47′, two degrees to the southward of Paris, yet the climate approximates to that of St. Petersburg, in 60º north.  It is upon record, that in … Continue reading The climate change debate, nineteenth-century style