The “high cost of higher ed” is in fact not going to college (and in not going to class)

David Leonhardt asks “Is College Worth It?,” and finds that the pay gap between college grads and people without college is at an all-time high.  Fortunately, he sings one of my favorite songs here too: [The] public discussion today — for which we in the news media deserve some responsibility — often focuses on the … Continue reading The “high cost of higher ed” is in fact not going to college (and in not going to class)

Finally, some reasoned analysis of the so-called “high cost of higher ed”

This strikes me as a sensible intervention into the typically un-nuanced conversation about the price of a four-year undergraduate degree.  And what’d’ya know–it’s from a panel of admissions officers, the kind of people whose job it is to know their target audience and to recruit and retain students? Steven Graff, senior director of admissions and … Continue reading Finally, some reasoned analysis of the so-called “high cost of higher ed”

The net effect of the "high cost of higher ed" argument

This is the first of the 2010-2011 academic year’s series, Excellence Without Money(a term coined by the b!tchez at Roxie’s World in their series on the high cost of not funding higher education.)  For the full archives at both blogs, click away on those links, darlings. I’ve been doing a little thinking about the effects of … Continue reading The net effect of the "high cost of higher ed" argument

Speaking of bubbles, the “higher ed bubble” bubble has popped, just in time for spring semester classes

Hey–remember all of those stories that were written at the depths of the Great Recession back in 2008-2010 about “the high cost of higher education,” warning young people not to waste their time or money on college degrees because all of these elite university grads from the 1970s and 1980s were confident that higher ed … Continue reading Speaking of bubbles, the “higher ed bubble” bubble has popped, just in time for spring semester classes

Why $0.78 on the dollar is probably still a high estimate of women’s compensation

We’re definitely underpaid, ladies, considering the extra layer of bull$h!t we have to deal with in the course of just doing our jobs.  Read on for a fascinating illustration of the costs of doing business when you have a female name and internet profile. Some of us have been having fun on the interwebs recently … Continue reading Why $0.78 on the dollar is probably still a high estimate of women’s compensation

Is it really “higher education” without tenured faculty?

How many of you college or university faculty members would have gone into your line of work without the hope of tenure? I was thinking about this with respect to a survey of provosts published by Inside Higher Ed today.  Among other interesting findings, the provosts surveyed said this about tenure: The survey found that … Continue reading Is it really “higher education” without tenured faculty?

The “crisis” in higher ed? truffula sniffs out “administrative bloat.”

Of all of the contributions I’ve had to the “crisis” of higher education meme inspired by Tony Grafton’s recent review in the New York Review of Books, no one has yet called out administrators and/or administrative bloat.  Most of us humanist faculty types appear to see the liberal arts college administrators as tapdancing as fast as they … Continue reading The “crisis” in higher ed? truffula sniffs out “administrative bloat.”

What’s the matter with higher ed? Too much talk about degrees, not enough talk about achievement.

I’ll have a comprehensive post up tomorrow with all of your wonderful links and contributions to this conversation, but I thought I’d lay out briefly something that I’ve been thinking about this week with respect to the ongoing “crisis of higher education” conversations we’ve been having.  In particular, I’d like once again to address the … Continue reading What’s the matter with higher ed? Too much talk about degrees, not enough talk about achievement.

Tony Grafton on the higher education crisis, and your turn to talk back!

Via my colleague Nathan Citino who reads the New York Review of Books, we learn that Tony Grafton has written a thoughtful review of the raft of books on the “crisis” of higher education in the United States published recently.  He dislikes the polemics that pick one enemy–the lazy-a$$ed faculty who allegedly never teach, or the … Continue reading Tony Grafton on the higher education crisis, and your turn to talk back!

Newsflash: Excellence Costs Money!

So says Sarah Lawrence College President Karen Lawrence about her college’s rating as the most expensive in the U.S.: That’s partly because over 90 percent of all Sarah Lawrence classes are small seminars (with an average of 11 students) and every seminar includes a “conference” component in which each student designs an independent project and meets … Continue reading Newsflash: Excellence Costs Money!