Today’s mailbag: Historiann offers a rope to Millie on the job market

Today’s mailbag brings us a thoroughly modern problem from Visiting Assistant Professor (VAP) and new Ph.D. Millie, who wonders if she should rush to get a book contract: I’m a VAP, on the job market, and trying to conceptualize the dissertation-to-manuscript process (I graduated this past academic year). That intellectual labor aside, the thing that’s … Continue reading Today’s mailbag: Historiann offers a rope to Millie on the job market

Tired of academic quit lit? Another view on academic labor.

Apparently responding to the recent spate of academic “quit lit,” Matthew Pratt Guterl writes: Let me tell you why not to quit. You’ve been told that the university is a back-breaking neoliberal machine. That it encourages a certain solipsism and inhibits any sort of solidarity. That it will wall you off from colleagues and comrades. That … Continue reading Tired of academic quit lit? Another view on academic labor.

The so-called “liberal” academic workplace

Just go read this description of a job interview in a humanities program at a rich SLAC.  The search Chair told our informant, Anonymous, that the young African American woman on the faculty had been denied tenure.  Some flava: Dr. Chair explained that the whole process had been very unpleasant and that the aforementioned white … Continue reading The so-called “liberal” academic workplace

Peace on Earth! Or, the Christmas that job wiki rage went viral.

Read this.  Then this.  Then read this, and finally, this post.  This last post is like a personalized rant from the job wikis, in which everyone with a job is a defender of the oppressive status quo, no one with tenure deserved it, and everyone on a search committee is making decisions with the specific … Continue reading Peace on Earth! Or, the Christmas that job wiki rage went viral.

Phantom plagiarists, academic boogeymen, and open access fears that go bump in the night

Some of you may have read about the recent call from the American Historical Association to Ph.D.-granting universities to permit their recently credentialed historians to leave their dissertations off-line for six years in order to give the junior scholar time to revise the dissertation for publication.  The AHA’s reasoning? History has been and remains a … Continue reading Phantom plagiarists, academic boogeymen, and open access fears that go bump in the night

Hark, a job! Assistant Professor, modern Britain, Baa Ram U.

FYI, from the h-net job advertisement: The Department of History at Colorado State University invites applications for the position of Assistant Professor of History, with a concentration in modern Britain (c. 1700 through the twentieth century, including the British Empire).  This is an entry-level tenure-track position, beginning August 16, 2013. The successful candidate will be … Continue reading Hark, a job! Assistant Professor, modern Britain, Baa Ram U.

The origins of the casualization of academic labor

Jonathan Rees draws our attention to comments by Thomas Frank in a recent issue of Harper’s (sorry–no link) about why he left academia to pursue a career as an independent writer and journalist: “Although it scarcely seems believable today, I originally came to journalism as a practical, responsible career move. It was the mid-1990s, I … Continue reading The origins of the casualization of academic labor

I didn't wake up angry about my six-hour per week job.

Over Ten Million Served:  Gendered Service in Lanugage and Literature Workplaces is a new book edited by Michelle A. Massé and Katie J. Hogan that raises two old questions:  1) Why don’t academic workplaces value service and honor it in career advancement to the degree it should be, and 2) How is this undervaluing of … Continue reading I didn't wake up angry about my six-hour per week job.