Christmas: the fraudulent holiday.

With many thanks to Eric Erickson for “Kwanzaa:  The Scientology of Holidays.”

DATELINE:  Jerusalem, 66 C.E.

What do you get when you take an anti-Roman felon and add a desire for Jewish nationalism? Christianity. What does the success of Christianity so far say about our modern Common Era?  It is a reflection of Common Era nihilism given legitimacy by scribes hell bent on diminishing the Pagan heritage of Rome.

Over the last few decades, scribes have profiled his “disciples” and family members close to Jesus Christ.  Apparently, our Roman gods and goddesses are too powerful and numerous for these Christ-lovers.

Christianity has absolutely nothing to do with Judea and everything to do with hating the Roman Empire.  Christianity is the brain child of Jesus, who you will not be surprised to learn claimed from early childhood that he was the son of YHWH, the Jewish God.  Some time after that, he took the name Christ, ran afoul of imperial officials, and proclaimed that belief in his divinity was required for entry into the afterlife. Continue reading

A guiding set of principles for the professional use of social media

cowgirl2After the flamewar over rage at the current academic job market, in which the rage was redirected onto Tenured Radical for daring to question the long-term effectiveness of complaining about the behavior of one search committee, TR wrote a post suggesting that it’s time to have a conversation about the professional use of social media:

My question is this: given that social media is ubiquitous among academics, and given that our colleagues and students are sometimes justifiably angry about important things, ought we not to have some more serious discussions about what kind of speech we do — and do not — find acceptable? Should we not begin to identify what kinds of virtual conversations lead to real change and community building; and which are destructive, vengeful or personal hubris masquerading as charismatic leadership?

There are clear signs that if we do not begin to have these conversations among ourselves, others will seize the initiative and faculty will find ourselves perpetually in the position of responding to university attorneys, trustees, politicians and administrators.

Great idea, right?  So far the flamewar at Tenured Radical has 190 comments (and counting!), whereas after three days the post suggesting that we all come together to figure out how to use social media productively for professional purposes has 34 comments.  That’s a little clue as to how easy and fun it is to tear someone down, make assumptions about their motives and professional experiences, and generally act like a jerk in social media, whereas it’s relatively difficult to build something together.

Please note:  this is not a blog post calling for civility, which I agree can be cover for preserving the power relations of the status quo.  This is a blog post proposing some guiding rules for the professional use of social media for those of us in academia (but they may apply in other professions, too).  As we’ve all been reminded endlessly over the past decade, The World Is Flat, and graduate students can email, Tweet, and comment on the blogs of full professors, and vice-versa.  This familiarity with one another over social media has been for the most part a good thing for everyone involved, but TR is right that we need to think about formulating some community standards before they’re formulated for us by our educators and/or employers.

This blog has always been about community-building, so friends, let’s rent a barn and put on a show!  At the risk of being torn to shreds myself, I’ll propose a set of guiding principles just to get the conversation going.  You tell me what you think I’ve missed and where I’m wrong, and together we’ll propose a set of guiding principles for the professional use of social media.  After a few days, I’ll publish our collectively revised or rewritten list of guiding principles. Continue reading

Who pays the price for a weaponized nation?

Anyone who lives in a home with a gun is at risk to kill or be killed:

A man who told police he shot and killed his 14-year-old stepdaughter after mistaking her for a burglar is a 29-year-old Fort Carson officer with multiple deployments behind him and a Bronze Star for service.

Sources on Wednesday confirmed that 2nd Lt. Daniel R. Meade is at the center of the tragedy that has drawn headlines across the world.

A dispatch recording suggests that Meade opened fire on the girl about 6 a.m. Monday as she was crawling through a window of a home in the 4000 block of Ascendant Drive, off North Carefree Circle and Peterson Road.

She died of her wounds at a Colorado Springs hospital later that day. Continue reading

Peace on Earth! Or, the Christmas that job wiki rage went viral.

Read thisThen this.  Then read this, and finally, this post.  This last post is like a personalized rant from the job wikis, in which everyone with a job is a defender of the oppressive status quo, no one with tenure deserved it, and everyone on a search committee is making decisions with the specific intent to hassle, rip off, or shame the job candidates.

As to the original topic of this flamewar:  I think most of us here can agree that it’s pretty abusive to give people less than a month’s notice, let alone less than a week’s notice that they’ll need to buy a plane ticket etc. for a mere first-round interview.  Regular readers will remember that I am in principle against the convention interview, and urge committees either to use Skype or to dispense with the semifinalist interviews all together and just bring people straight to campus.  It seems to work in other nations and in other fields, but historians and lit perfessers tend to resort to the “but that’s the way we’ve always done it!” excuse. Continue reading

Feeling grinchy, and you?

Maureen DowdI just paid $215 to register for the American Historical Association 2014 conference as a non-member, which strikes me as a confiscatory rate. Why am I not a member? I already get too many journals every quarter that I can’t keep up with and which just take up space on a bookshelf. I’m not on the job market. And at my incredibly low salary, it would still cost me $118 per year to join.  I figure I can use that toward another plane ticket to Quebec or somewhere else I can get some real work done.

I admit that when I was a grad student on the market, I rarely (if ever!) paid to register for this conference. Quite honestly, I wasn’t using any conference services or going to the receptions (and I only sneaked into the book exhibit once with a borrowed badge). I just showed up for my interviews and then made myself scarce until I had to face the next one. However, I consider it my duty now to pay full freight on the rare occasion that I go to this conference. I don’t have much travel money, so I’m not sure Baa Ram U. will even cover this much of the conference expenses (although it did buy my plane ticket. We only get $1,200 of travel money, so most of us end up footing at least half of the bills–or much more–for our ongoing professional development and research trips.) Continue reading